Virtual Exhibition: Carlos Alfonzo, Witnessing Perpetuity

CARLOS ALFONZO
WITNESSING PERPETUITY
EXPERIENCE IT VIRTUALLY!

LnS Gallery brings Carlos Alfonzo: Witnessing Perpetuity to a close with a virtual exhibition!

A 3D Virtual Rendering of the Carlos Alfonzo: Witnessing Perpetuity Exhibition

Please click on the photo or link above to view the virtual show. You can enjoy an automated tour by clicking the play button in the bottom left corner. If you want to experience the virtual exhibition without automation, click on the circles on the ground to move throughout the space and click on the colored dots located on the walls to learn more about the artwork. On your computer, you can use the arrow keys and can move forward and backward by using your mouse to look in 360 degrees. You can also use your mouse or track pad to click on the circles and colored dots. If you would like a private tour of the virtual exhibition, please contact us at info@lnsgallery.com to set up your appointment via Zoom.

Exhibition Catalogue features the essay Carlos Alfonzo: Transformative Work from Cuba to Miami and the U.S., by Julia P. Herzberg, Ph.D.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE ON THE EXHIBITION

ICAA Launches New Website: Documents of Latin American and Latino Art

At the International Center for the Arts of the Americas (ICAA) website, you can explore more than 8,000 documents of 20th and 21st-century art in Latin America, the Caribbean, and among US Latino communities.

From Carmen Ramírez, Founding Director:

“[…] the redesigned platform more accurately reflects the activities, events, and interdisciplinary programs of the Center and its flagship project, Documents of Latin American and Latino Art (ICAA Documents Project). The user-friendly site facilitates direct, immediate access to the more than 8,000 primary sources and critical texts that make up the ICAA Documents Project. It also encourages users to browse by “author,” “title,” “date” and “topic”; save their results in a “my documents” section; and share them with friends and colleagues. Additionally, the platform allows the ICAA’s vetted partners to upload primary-source materials directly to the site, thereby significantly expanding the recovery process that is a core function of any digital repository.”

Check out the new website here.

Image digitized from: Bardi, Lina Bo. “Bahia: Museu de Arte Moderna.” Mirante das Artes (São Paulo, Brazil), no. 6 (Novembro/ Dezembro,1967): 17- 24.

“Creating Bridges: Personal Journeys into Art and Writing”

As our treasured museums and cultural institutions close to protect the public health the role they play in the vitality of our communities comes into sharp focus and we miss them. Please support them as you can. We look ahead to their return.

Museo Eduardo Carrillo as an online museum offers you our free, online, sharable resources to help support your children as they learn at home.

Master teacher Wendy Thompson developed the California state standards aligned “Creating Bridges: Personal Journeys into Art and Writing” for the Hablamos Juntos Project, a joint project between the Young Writers Program and Museo Eduardo Carrillo. This unit connects art appreciation, language development, cultural understanding and writing skills in an 8-10 week curricular unit using contemporary Latinx art to inspire Personal Narratives. Especially suitable for middle and high schoolers our curriculum is highly adaptable for your needs. All based on Latinx artworks, it can successfully be adapted for humanities, social studies and history curriculum as many images deal with historic themes.

HERE’S AN EXAMPLE FOR INSPIRATION!

Photograph by Lesha Marie Rodriguez

An inspired student wrote:
“This picture reminds me of my great grandmama. She is a strong Cherokee Indian Christian woman, and she spends most of her day in her room on her knees, praying for her family. She really cares for us a lot.”

“Este cuadro me recuerda a mi gran abuelita. Ella es una india cherokee fuerte y cristiana, que pasa la mayor parte del día en su habitación de rodillas, rezando por su familia. Realmente le importamos mucho.”
—Angelique Destany Montaño Lopez

Click here to hear Angelique reading her piece…
https://artsandculture.google.com/exhibit/LgKi4nmjUvUXKQ

DOWNLOAD A PDF OF THE CURRICULUM HERE…
https://museoeduardocarrillo.org/protected/HablamosJuntos-CreatingBridges.pdf

Tyson Scholars of American Art Program at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

Apply now for a fellowship to support your research. Crystal Bridges invites applications addressing a variety of topics including American art history, architecture, visual and material culture, Indigenous art, Latin American Art, American studies, craft and contemporary art that expand traditional categories of investigation into American art. Projects with an interdisciplinary focus are encouraged.

The program is open to scholars affiliated with a university, museum, or independent holding a PhD (or equivalent) and PhD candidates. Scholars are selected based on potential to advance understanding of American art and intersect with Crystal Bridges’ collections, architecture, or landscape.

Terms range from six weeks to nine months. Tyson Scholars have access to the art and library collections of Crystal Bridges and the University of Arkansas library. Housing is provided near Crystal Bridges. Workspace at the museum is also provided. Stipends vary depending on duration of residency and experience, and range from $15,000 to $30,000 per semester. Additional funds for relocation and research travel funds are also available.

For more information, visit: http://crystalbridges.org/tyson-scholars/. Applications open November 1st, 2019. Deadline for the 2020-2021 academic year is January 15, 2020.

Beyond Biography: Artistic Practice and Personhood in Colonial Latin America

October 10, 2019 / 6:00 pm / University of Florida, Smathers 100, Keynote Lecture by Dr. Susan V. Webster

October 11, 2019 / 9:30 am – 5:00 pm / University of Florida, Harn Museum of Art, Additional Speakers  

What was the nature of artistic work in colonial Latin America? This symposium gathers leading scholars to think about artistic subjectivity without focusing on names or “life’s work.” We will consider artistic personhood and practice within social structures, in relation to medium, and as determined by gender, age, and race. We strive for a greater understanding of colonial Latin American art itself, as well as of the human agency that brought it into being.

A Claim for Craft in the Development of Artists’ Rights

Maya Stanfield-Mazzi, Associate Professor of Art History, University of Florida


The Artist-Cartographers of the Uppsala Map of Mexico-Tenochtitlan (c. 1540)

Jennifer Saracino, Assistant Professor of Art History, Flagler College


Angelina Martina: A Tlatelolca Merchant or a Feather Artisan?

Margarita Vargas-Betancourt, Latin American and Caribbean Special Collections Librarian, University of Florida


The Power of Expertise: Artists as Arbiters of the Miraculous in Colonial Latin America

Derek Burdette, Assistant Professor of Art History, University of Florida


Academic Ambitions in New Spain

Aaron M. Hyman, Assistant Professor of Art History, Johns Hopkins University


The Face of the Virgin and the Hand of the Artist: Thinking about Anonymity in Colonial South America

Emily Floyd, Lecturer in History of Art, University College London


Art-Making and Art-Breaking in the Era of Tupac Amaru

Ananda Cohen-Aponte, Associate Professor of Art History, Cornell University

CFP: ASSEMBLING A MEXICAN PAST

CFP: College Art Association, Annual Conference, Chicago, February 12–15, 2020

Deadline for paper proposals, July 23, 2019

Delia A. Cosentino, DePaul University

Barbara E. Mundy, Fordham University

More than any other nation in the Americas, Mexico has confronted the enduring artistic legacy of past eras–be they Zapotec sculptures unearthed in Oaxaca, sorrowing Virgins in side chapels of Baroque churches, or Porfirian-era public monuments–and from this has built narratives about the past. The selection and sequence takes on particular pressure during anniversaries–favored opportunities to think about the shape of time past. Given that the year 2020 marks a set of Mexican anniversaries– the years 1520 (Spanish-Aztec War), 1820 (Independence), and 1920 (Revolution), we invite papers that examine how Greater Mexico’s past has been configured and reconfigured over time through specific assemblages of and/or within objects and artworks. In seeking papers that address a diversity of subject matters and moments across time, we invite reflection on these questions: How do choices of such assemblages by artists, scholars, leaders, and/or patrons reflect and reshape the politics of a given moment? What is the relation between archeological assemblage and art historical narrative? What is the role of the context [or frame]–be it tomb, church, home, or museum–on Mexico’s assembled past?

 Please email your paper proposal, CV & CAA proposal form by July 23, 2019 to dcosent1@depaul.edu and mundy@fordham.edu

You may download the CAA form here:

https://caa.confex.com/caa/2020/webprogrampreliminary/meeting.html