EXH Closing: Architectural Models from the Ancient Americas at the Met. Museum of Art, NY

Design for Eternity

Architectural Models from the Ancient Americas

October 26, 2015–September 18, 2016

#DesignforEternity

Architectural model

From the first millennium B.C. until the arrival of Europeans in the sixteenth century, artists from the ancient Americas created small-scale architectural models to be placed in the tombs of important individuals. These works in stone, ceramic, wood, and metal range from highly abstracted, minimalist representations of temples and houses to elaborate architectural complexes populated with figures. Such miniature structures were critical components in funerary practice and beliefs about an afterlife, and they convey a rich sense of ancient ritual as well as the daily lives of the Aztecs, the Incas, and their predecessors.

This exhibition, the first of its kind in the United States, sheds light on the role of these objects in mediating relationships between the living, the dead, and the divine. It also provides a rare look at ancient American architecture, much of which did not survive to the present day. Some thirty remarkable loans from museums in the United States and Peru join works from the Metropolitan Museum’s permanent collection, which is particularly rich in this material.

For more information please see http://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2015/design-for-eternity

Art before History | Arte antes de la Historia

International Symposium

Art before History: Towards a History of Ancient Andean Art

Arte antes de la Historia: Para una Historia del Arte Andino Antiguo

June 22–24, 2016

Auditorio de Humanidades, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Lima

Although art of the ancient Americas has been a subject of study in art history programs in the United States, Mexico, and Europe since the 1960s, in Peru research on pre-Hispanic art and visual culture has for the most part remained within the discipline of anthropological archaeology. This symposium is designed to assess and debate the state of the field of the study of ancient Andean art and visual culture, within Peru and internationally. Invited speakers have been asked to address the disciplinary coordinates of their methodologies and theoretical approaches to ancient Andean art history and visual studies, from Cupisnique to Inka, and with reflections from colonial and modern perspectives.

The symposium is co-organized by Marco Curatola-Petrocchi, Cécile Michaud, Joanne Pillsbury, and Lisa Trever, with support from the Programa de Estudios Andinos, Maestría en Historia del Arte y Curaduría, and the University of California Humanities Research Institute.

More information is available at artbeforehistory.wordpress.com or follow us on Twitter @ArtBeforeHist

EXH Opening: Ancient American Architectural Models at the Met. Museum of Art, NY

Design for Eternity

Architectural Models from the Ancient Americas

October 26, 2015–September 18, 2016

#DesignforEternity

Architectural model

From the first millennium B.C. until the arrival of Europeans in the sixteenth century, artists from the ancient Americas created small-scale architectural models to be placed in the tombs of important individuals. These works in stone, ceramic, wood, and metal range from highly abstracted, minimalist representations of temples and houses to elaborate architectural complexes populated with figures. Such miniature structures were critical components in funerary practice and beliefs about an afterlife, and they convey a rich sense of ancient ritual as well as the daily lives of the Aztecs, the Incas, and their predecessors.

This exhibition, the first of its kind in the United States, sheds light on the role of these objects in mediating relationships between the living, the dead, and the divine. It also provides a rare look at ancient American architecture, much of which did not survive to the present day. Some thirty remarkable loans from museums in the United States and Peru join works from the Metropolitan Museum’s permanent collection, which is particularly rich in this material.

For more information please see http://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2015/design-for-eternity