ICAA Launches New Website: Documents of Latin American and Latino Art

At the International Center for the Arts of the Americas (ICAA) website, you can explore more than 8,000 documents of 20th and 21st-century art in Latin America, the Caribbean, and among US Latino communities.

From Carmen Ramírez, Founding Director:

“[…] the redesigned platform more accurately reflects the activities, events, and interdisciplinary programs of the Center and its flagship project, Documents of Latin American and Latino Art (ICAA Documents Project). The user-friendly site facilitates direct, immediate access to the more than 8,000 primary sources and critical texts that make up the ICAA Documents Project. It also encourages users to browse by “author,” “title,” “date” and “topic”; save their results in a “my documents” section; and share them with friends and colleagues. Additionally, the platform allows the ICAA’s vetted partners to upload primary-source materials directly to the site, thereby significantly expanding the recovery process that is a core function of any digital repository.”

Check out the new website here.

Image digitized from: Bardi, Lina Bo. “Bahia: Museu de Arte Moderna.” Mirante das Artes (São Paulo, Brazil), no. 6 (Novembro/ Dezembro,1967): 17- 24.

“Creating Bridges: Personal Journeys into Art and Writing”

As our treasured museums and cultural institutions close to protect the public health the role they play in the vitality of our communities comes into sharp focus and we miss them. Please support them as you can. We look ahead to their return.

Museo Eduardo Carrillo as an online museum offers you our free, online, sharable resources to help support your children as they learn at home.

Master teacher Wendy Thompson developed the California state standards aligned “Creating Bridges: Personal Journeys into Art and Writing” for the Hablamos Juntos Project, a joint project between the Young Writers Program and Museo Eduardo Carrillo. This unit connects art appreciation, language development, cultural understanding and writing skills in an 8-10 week curricular unit using contemporary Latinx art to inspire Personal Narratives. Especially suitable for middle and high schoolers our curriculum is highly adaptable for your needs. All based on Latinx artworks, it can successfully be adapted for humanities, social studies and history curriculum as many images deal with historic themes.

HERE’S AN EXAMPLE FOR INSPIRATION!

Photograph by Lesha Marie Rodriguez

An inspired student wrote:
“This picture reminds me of my great grandmama. She is a strong Cherokee Indian Christian woman, and she spends most of her day in her room on her knees, praying for her family. She really cares for us a lot.”

“Este cuadro me recuerda a mi gran abuelita. Ella es una india cherokee fuerte y cristiana, que pasa la mayor parte del día en su habitación de rodillas, rezando por su familia. Realmente le importamos mucho.”
—Angelique Destany Montaño Lopez

Click here to hear Angelique reading her piece…
https://artsandculture.google.com/exhibit/LgKi4nmjUvUXKQ

DOWNLOAD A PDF OF THE CURRICULUM HERE…
https://museoeduardocarrillo.org/protected/HablamosJuntos-CreatingBridges.pdf

Beyond Biography: Artistic Practice and Personhood in Colonial Latin America

October 10, 2019 / 6:00 pm / University of Florida, Smathers 100, Keynote Lecture by Dr. Susan V. Webster

October 11, 2019 / 9:30 am – 5:00 pm / University of Florida, Harn Museum of Art, Additional Speakers  

What was the nature of artistic work in colonial Latin America? This symposium gathers leading scholars to think about artistic subjectivity without focusing on names or “life’s work.” We will consider artistic personhood and practice within social structures, in relation to medium, and as determined by gender, age, and race. We strive for a greater understanding of colonial Latin American art itself, as well as of the human agency that brought it into being.

A Claim for Craft in the Development of Artists’ Rights

Maya Stanfield-Mazzi, Associate Professor of Art History, University of Florida


The Artist-Cartographers of the Uppsala Map of Mexico-Tenochtitlan (c. 1540)

Jennifer Saracino, Assistant Professor of Art History, Flagler College


Angelina Martina: A Tlatelolca Merchant or a Feather Artisan?

Margarita Vargas-Betancourt, Latin American and Caribbean Special Collections Librarian, University of Florida


The Power of Expertise: Artists as Arbiters of the Miraculous in Colonial Latin America

Derek Burdette, Assistant Professor of Art History, University of Florida


Academic Ambitions in New Spain

Aaron M. Hyman, Assistant Professor of Art History, Johns Hopkins University


The Face of the Virgin and the Hand of the Artist: Thinking about Anonymity in Colonial South America

Emily Floyd, Lecturer in History of Art, University College London


Art-Making and Art-Breaking in the Era of Tupac Amaru

Ananda Cohen-Aponte, Associate Professor of Art History, Cornell University

Culture and the People: El Museo del Barrio, 1969-2019

On View April 11 – September 29, 2019  

Curated by Susanna V. Temkin, El Museo’s Curator, and co-organized by Noel Valentin, El Museo’s Permanent Collection Manager 

In celebration of its 50th anniversary, El Museo del Barrio presents Culture and the People: El Museo del Barrio1969-2019, a two-part exhibition featuring selections from the Permanent Collection and a timeline contextualizing the history of the institution with related archival materials. The exhibition will reflect on the institution’s activist origins and pioneering role as a cultural and educational organization dedicated to presenting and preserving Latinx and Latin American art and culture. The exhibition borrows its title from an essay penned by one of the Museum’s founders and its first director Raphael Montañez Ortíz, who outlined his concept for the institution in a 1971 article published in Art in America

In addition to the two part-exhibition Culture and the People, El Museo will initiate a cycle of exhibitions dedicated to the Museum’s Permanent Collection in 2020. The cycle will focus on specific works from the collection, including room-size installations and in-depth bodies of work, enabling El Museo’s curators to work directly with artists, scholars, and conservators to uncover new research and grant further public access to the Museum’s Permanent Collection.

New Exhibition: Written in Knots: Undeciphered Accounts of Andean Life, 4/ 2–8/18




Long before the arrival of the Spaniards, the people of South America had a system of recorded information that was portable, precise, and so complex that it remains undeciphered today.


The long-lived Wari Empire and vast Inka Empire employed sophisticated devices called khipu to record information, such as census data and labor obligations. Made of cords, both Inka and Wari khipu seem to have recorded not only quantitative or statistical content, but narrative information as well. The variation in cord structures, colors, wrapping patterns, and knots encoded and conveyed information, while the basic khipu elements—flexible knotted cords—offered a lightweight and compact means of transporting information across distances.


This exhibition is the first to bring together examples of Wari, Inka, and Colonial khipu. Less than a dozen complete Wari khipu are known to exist in museum collections, and three will be on display at Dumbarton Oaks, along with interactive displays that will help visitors understand the way khipu worked, how they were made, and how information was encoded.
Juan Antonio Murro, Assistant Curator of the Pre-Columbian Collection, is curating this exhibition with Jeffrey Splitstoser, PhD, an expert on Wari khipu and ancient textiles and Assistant Research Professor of Anthropology at George Washington University.

– From doaks.org. Click here for more information.